Archive for September, 2010

Ropeways

September 29, 2010

Cable car to the Brits, aerial tramways to the Yanks, the Japanese like to call them ropeways.
Hakone Ropeway at Hakone, Honshu, Japan :
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The above picture was taken sometime in the late 1990s, the system was upgraded with new cars in 2002. This ropeway links Sounzan, a town up in the mountain, to Togendai on the shore of Lake Ashi.

Japanese have their own cable car system. This is the Hakone Tozan cable car, which is very similar to San Francisco’s :
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The cable car link the town of Gora where this picture is taken, to the town of Sounzan, 214m up in the mountain.

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Cable car or tram?

September 21, 2010

Famous American cable car is found in San Francisco. A lot of people mistook it to be a tram.
Both tram and San Francisco’s cable cars ran on rails. The cable car does not have an engine, unlike a tram. The San Francisco system has a cable running below the road surface. The cable is kept running at about 9mph by a motor at the cable car barn. Each car has a grip which cramp on to the moving cable to move forward. To stop the car, the driver release the clamp. At both end of the line, the driver has to turn the car around manually on a turn table.
Nice postcard of San Francisco’s cable car :
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Cable car system :
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Hoards of tourist lining up to ride the cable car :
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Cable car or aerial tramway?

September 16, 2010

A car is a car, a bus is a bus. A cable car is a cable car. Or is it? The term cable car is used by British, the American call them aerial tramway. To the Brits, tramway generally refers to surface rail based street trams, propelled by horses or electricity. To the Yankees, cable car refers to surface cable pulled street trams. Being former British colony, we called our Sentosa system “cable cars”.
Cable cars were originally built to move ores in mountaineous mining areas. Later adopt for carrying passengers up mountains. They are cheaper to built compared to mountain funicular railways.
Here are some cable cars which I have the opportunity to ride on.

The old Genting Highlands cable car, Malaysia :
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Grouse Mountain, British Columbia, Canada :
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Stockhorn, Switzerland :
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Rotorua, North Island, New Zealand :
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Taitetsu National Park, Hokkaido, Japan :
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The biggest one I have tried is this one at Mount Aso, Kyushu, Japan :
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Buses of Youth Olympic Games part 2

September 6, 2010

Unsual vehicle used on YOV10 is this SBS Transit Scania K230UB YOG3579, which did not have the standard YOG livery, probably spare/standby vehicle :
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Cross border coaches were also used. YOG3402 belongs to Orange Coach :
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The worst bus is this YOG3551 from ComfortDelgro. The engine make a loud weird noise as if it is about to fall off the bus :
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One surprise was this Kinglong hybrid low floor city bus YOG3404 which make its appearance after been stored for a long time. This bus arrived in Singapore last year and has never been registered prior to YOG :
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SBS Transit supplied the buses to ferry the volunteers and workers from Boon Lay to YOV. A fleet of Scania K230UB were used :
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Volvo is the official sponsor of the games. They supplied a number of cars for official use :
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All taxis are deployed from ComfortDelgro’s taxi fleet. All of them were Mercedes Benz :
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Buses of Youth Olympic Games part 1

September 1, 2010

The Youth Olympic Games (YOG) was held on 14 to 26 August. Hundreds of vehicles were deployed the participants and guest during the 13 days. Three area were used for vehicle parking :
1. Old Boon Lay bus interchange (for buses) :
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2. PA Kallang (for buses) :
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3. Car park at 4th Chin Bee Road (for taxis) :
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Old Boon Lay bus interchange was also the place for vehicle security screening before they were allowed to go into the Youth Olympic Games Village (YOV). All vehicle compartments, doors, windows are sealed after inspection :
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A closed up view of the security seal :
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Upon arrival at the YOV, the buses were inspected again to make sure that all the seals were intact before they were allowed into the YOV.
All buses used during the games are stickered in purple, red or green livery. In addition, permits had to displayed on the front windscreen :
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The buses with red livery served the city area operating on CT, H and venue to venue services.
CT services link Marina Bay Sands to competition venue. H services are hotel shuttles.
Buses with purple livery served the Olympic Village operating on YOV services which link the Olympic Village to the competition venue. The exception is YOV00, this service operate between YOV and Marina Bay Sands.
The only one green liveried bus is the Higer Fuel Cell bus which operate as an internal shuttle within the YOV:
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During the trial run for driver route familiarisation, the buses carried three digit YOG1XX registration numbers. YOG116 leaving old Boon Lay bus interchange :
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During the Games period, the three digit numbers were replaced by four digit numbers.
All the buses used belonged to private operator with ComfortDelgro as the main contractor.
YOG2215 on CT10 service is a new model introduced by Higer this year, KLQ6125B :
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YOG3333 of Sungee Travel is the only CNG bus used :
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Some coaches were pressed into service without any YOG livery. YOG3362 is one of them still in Woodland Transport livery :
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